Tag Archives: 2015

Meet Kim – the power behind Riverview Law’s Legal Virtual Assistant plans

Riverview Law has today gone live with Kim, technology that will from Q1 2016 power a ground breaking series of legal Virtual Assistants which complement existing Riverview Law managed service and technology solutions.

Kim is the new name for the technology that combines the CliXLEX platform, which Riverview Law acquired in August 2015, with the output from its R&D unit plus the other technologies that Riverview Law has invested in. Riverview Law worked with CliXLEX for a year before acquiring the company. These latest developments build on Riverview Law’s partnership with the University of Liverpool to leverage its artificial intelligence and related expertise.

The Kim technology is applicable to all sectors and is already being used outside the legal market. In addition to licensing its technology to third parties Kim will, in certain areas, launch its own products.

The Riverview Law Virtual Assistants are designed to help legal teams make quicker and better decisions. They will be able to take on many tasks for lawyers, combining Riverview Law’s legal domain expertise with automation, expert systems, reporting, visualisations and artificial intelligence.

Following extensive R&D, beta-testing and planning, the first Virtual Assistants will be launched at a London press conference in Q1 2016, with more released throughout 2016. They are aimed at all businesses that have an in-house function and will be available globally, including to other law firms.

When these Virtual Assistants are launched Riverview Law will have a comprehensive suite of technology solutions that range from tailored applications for global organisations on an enterprise-wide basis through to off-the-shelf, quick to launch, pre-configured tools for in-house teams.

Karl Chapman, Chief Executive of Riverview Law, says: “Because the Kim technology is applicable to all sectors, we are running this subsidiary as if it is a stand-alone business. In this context Riverview Law licenses the Kim technology on an arms-length basis and exploits it in the legal market, which is our domain expertise. During 2016 we will review the best way in which we can ensure that Kim fulfils its potential, globally, while ensuring that the Riverview Law board remains focused on delivering solutions for the fast changing legal market.”

“Most businesses are, or are becoming, technology-led. Riverview Law is no exception. We handle thousands of legal matters every year for global corporations, mid-sized and fast-growing businesses. This expertise allows us to productise our knowledge in ways that help in-house functions of all sizes, in all sectors, globally. As a board we are very focused on scaling our business internationally using technology as the entry point into new geographies.”

Kim stands for Knowledge, Intelligence, Meaning. Knowledge is pervasive, intelligence requires meaning and context to be effective and www.ask.kim provides all three.

 

Meet Kim – the power behind Riverview Law’s Legal Virtual Assistant plans

Riverview Law has today gone live with Kim, technology that will from Q1 2016 power a ground breaking series of legal Virtual Assistants which complement existing Riverview Law managed service and technology solutions. Kim is the new name for the technology that combines the CliXLEX platform, which Riverview Law acquired in August 2015, with the output from its R&D unit plus the other technologies that Riverview Law has invested in. Riverview Law worked with CliXLEX for a year before acquiring the company. These latest developments build on Riverview Law’s partnership with the University of Liverpool to leverage its artificial intelligence and related expertise. The Kim technology is applicable to all sectors and is already being used outside the legal market. In addition to licensing its technology to third parties Kim will, in certain areas, launch its own products. The Riverview Law Virtual Assistants are designed to help legal teams make quicker and better decisions. They will be able to take on many tasks for lawyers, combining Riverview Law’s legal domain expertise with automation, expert systems, reporting, visualisations and artificial intelligence. Following extensive R&D, beta-testing and planning, the first Virtual Assistants will be launched at a London press conference in Q1 2016, with more released throughout 2016. They are aimed at all businesses that have an in-house function and will be available globally, including to other law firms. When these Virtual Assistants are launched Riverview Law will have a comprehensive suite of technology solutions that range from tailored applications for global organisations on an enterprise-wide basis through to off-the-shelf, quick to launch, pre-configured tools for in-house teams. Karl Chapman, Chief Executive of Riverview Law, says: “Because the Kim technology is applicable to all sectors, we are running this subsidiary as if it is a stand-alone business. In this context Riverview Law licenses the Kim technology on an arms-length basis and exploits it in the legal market, which is our domain expertise. During 2016 we will review the best way in which we can ensure that Kim fulfils its potential, globally, while ensuring that the Riverview Law board remains focused on delivering solutions for the fast changing legal market.” “Most businesses are, or are becoming, technology-led. Riverview Law is no exception. We handle thousands of legal matters every year for global corporations, mid-sized and fast-growing businesses. This expertise allows us to productise our knowledge in ways that help in-house functions of all sizes, in all sectors, globally. As a board we are very focused on scaling our business internationally using technology as the entry point into new geographies.” Kim stands for Knowledge, Intelligence, Meaning. Knowledge is pervasive, intelligence requires meaning and context to be effective and www.ask.kim provides all three.  

December 2015 Market Horizon Scanning

Welcome to the December 2015 edition of the Riverview Law Market Scanning Report. As part of our market and horizon scanning activities we have always collected and circulated internally relevant legal market articles, commentaries, reports and blogs. When we shared this data with a GC he asked why we didn’t routinely share this with him because he’d find it invaluable. It was a good question! So, we now publish this report which, as you’ll see below, contains links to what we think are the most interesting and relevant legal market commentaries of November 2015 and previous months. Best wishes,

November 2015

How new technology is shaking up law firms http://rv-l.com/1NnDRki Raconteur November 2015 This is the biggest shift going on in artificial intelligence http://rv-l.com/1YHgzhz Tech Insider November 28 2015 Growth won’t solve your firm’s problems http://rv-l.com/1N3jJ7Z Beaton Capital November 25 2015

The quiet revolution – poll of 2,000 lawyers reveals law firms are waking up to power of technology http://rv-l.com/1llfYU8 Legal Week November 23 2015

Comment: Artificial intelligence and the law – mostly believe the hype http://rv-l.com/1QTpU4B Legal Business November 10 2015

Artificial intelligence “could be good news” for lawyers and clients alike http://rv-l.com/1PBZZMW Legal Futures November 10 2015 Customers are the winners when the iTunes moment hits law http://rv-l.com/20ubNFU Legal Business report: AI and the law tools of tomorrow November 04 2015 Artificial Intelligence in Law – The State of Play in 2015? http://rv-l.com/1YHthgl Legal IT Insider November 03 2015

Google’s New AI Will Reply to Your Emails so You Don’t Have To http://rv-l.com/1MNgxw9 Fortune November 03 2015

Robot doctors and lawyers? It’s a change we should embrace http://rv-l.com/1koiPLB Daniel Susskind, The Guardian November 02 2015

Why Lawyers Can’t Ignore Technology http://rv-l.com/1k7by3h Bloomberg BNA November 02 2015

 

Would you rather be Uber or a taxi driver?

Reflections on a week with our tech team in the US

Until recently if I needed a taxi I used to add 10 minutes to my likely journey time given the impossibility of knowing when I would successfully flag down a black cab. Now the days of getting wet, missing a train, being late for a meeting are, traffic permitting, gone. Thanks to Uber. Uber owns no cars and employs no drivers. At its simplest it built an app that has dramatically changed, virtually overnight, the supply chain in personal transportation. Uber makes it easy for customers to travel from A to B. Customers get the solution they want at a lower price. Of course, as lawyers often tell me, there are no lessons here for legal or other professional services. None of Uber, Airbnb, Amazon, iTunes speak to the legal market, the potential for disintermediation or the consequences of customers being provided with a better solution. Law is different. Really? After another exhilarating week in the US with our CTO and the tech team of our recent acquisition, I’m even more convinced that the direction of travel is very clear. Uber, Airbnb, Amazon, iTunes, and many others, all talk to the disintermediation that good, simple, low cost technology can bring. They show what happens when customers are given easy to use tools. They change our behaviour. So what will change behaviour in the legal market? What will make customers, whether they are large corporations, mid-sized or small businesses and/or consumers change the way they use legal services? I’ve no doubt that one of the leading change agents in the legal market will be digital / virtual assistants. Tools that when deployed to customers change their behaviour. Tools that enable customers to do what they and suppliers currently do better, quicker and at lower cost. Tools that enable them to select the most effective and efficient supplier, quickly, and switch between in-house and external suppliers at will. This is where the parallels with Uber, a poster-child for technology disintermediation, become interesting: Knowledge and experience: London taxis drivers refer to ‘The Knowledge’, a stringent test that they have to pass to get their licence, as one of their major differentiators. The Knowledge tests the drivers ability to get from location A to location B via the shortest route. London taxi drivers are renowned for knowing all the roads and the routes in London. Before Satnavs / GPS this may have been an advantage. Technology has commoditised The Knowledge and virtual assistants have made it easy for any driver to find their destination. The same will happen in large areas of the law. Of course, The Knowledge ought to help in complex situations; Satnavs / GPS sometimes struggle if they need to divert from the obvious route. But this just speaks to the top of the legal pyramid and the protection that some players will be afforded. Even here much of the complex work will be delivered in a different way. Regulation: Uber has been and is being subjected to significant legal challenges. Taxi operators in many countries object to its model because it is not regulated in the same way. Well, object they may, the reality is that customers have and are voting with their wallets. The message customers have sent is compete or wither on the vine. Taxi operators need to recognise that monopoly pricing and a lack of innovation (they could have invented Uber) is now harming rather than helping them. The same will happen in large areas of the law. Profits and margins are only going one way for the vast majority of incumbents. The next generation If you speak to older drivers you will hear them say that it is not the same as it was, that when they started, they never thought that that their human expertise and knowledge could be replaced by technology. They add that they are pleased that they are coming to the end of their career and they worry about young cabbies. They recognise that they lived in what will be seen as a golden era for taxi drivers. There are too many drivers and Uber has compounded the problem. Of course, there is no over-supply of lawyers in the UK and the US and none of us have heard partners in law firms say that they are pleased that they are coming towards the end of their careers given the changing landscape! In this sense the only difference between taxi drivers and lawyers is that the taxi market is further into its restructuring than law is. The same will happen in large areas of the law. Disintermediation: In practice the black cabs of London and the yellow cabs of New York have been disintermediated. Until Uber we, the customer, were dependent on a taxi being in the right place at the right time. Taxi drivers determined whether we could take a ride because either they were there or they were not. Now we decide. A simple app has changed the value chain. It has brought more supply into the market. It has put the customer at the centre of the model. It has reduced prices and improved the customer experience. The same will happen in large areas of the law. I’d rather be Uber than a taxi driver even though I’ve had many brilliant taxi rides with opinionated London cabbies who have either told me the result of the next election, loved/hated my beloved Chelsea and/or moaned about … well everything, including Uber. Of course, and to quote a well-known legal commentator, I may be wrong. But, it’s better to compete than moan and I know where we’re investing our time and money; building a technology-led business with deep legal domain expertise. We will employ more lawyers next year than we do this year and we will employ even more lawyers in future years. But within a few years we will have more developers, data analysts, knowledge engineers, client managers … etc than we have lawyers. It is this combination of tech and domain expertise that will win in the emerging legal market. After all, Uber has a valuation of US$50bn and employs less than 2000 people while the value of a yellow cab medallion in NY has almost halved. Customers are the winners when legal virtual / digital assistants become widely available; assistants who will not be restricted to the legal market! Karl Chapman, Chief Executive, Riverview Law

Customers are the winners when the iTunes moment hits law

The below is an article written by our CEO, Karl Chapman, in the Legal Business report ‘AI and the law tools of tomorrow‘ which was published in November 2015 in association with Riverview Law.

Customers are the winners when the iTunes moment hits law

Change is in the air. You can sense it. Actually you can experience it, now!

We see a rapidly growing desire among our customers to understand how the technology revolution we’re living through will impact business models generally, their business, their function, and their people specifically. Twenty-six years after Tim Berners-Lee invented the World Wide Web there is a realisation that none of us are immune from the exponential impact of Moore’s law. A law that has had (and will have!) many consequences, including IBM Watson (a computer), beating the two all-time (human) champions on the TV game show ‘Jeopardy!’. Law is definitely not immune from this revolution. Neither are other professional services (TurboTax), taxi drivers (Uber), hotels (Airbnb), record shops (iTunes)… The regulatory barriers that protected sectors are falling, failing or being overtaken by customer action. Trust in brands and professionals is being replaced by alternative trust systems. LegalZoom is the best known legal brand in the US. None of us needs to trust in a hotel brand now that we have the combined experience of contributors to TripAdvisor. Accepted norms and ways to do things are being challenged, daily, by increasingly connected customers, whether consumers or businesses. Start-ups and technology have no blinkers, they do not know it cannot be done. Think about the implications of the wonderful comment from the IBM executive who said: “Watson doesn’t know it won Jeopardy!” In legal this growing desire to understand has to be measured against a low starting point. When we set up Riverview Law in 2012 and talked about the impact on the delivery of legal services and lawyers of automation, expert systems, analytics and visualisations we were greeted with the same shrug of irrelevance and ‘you don’t understand the law, dear boy’ as we do now when we talk about computable contracts, blockchains, virtual assistants, and the rise of the knowledge worker.

ai-and-the-law-tools-of-tomorrow

However, over the last year there has been a change. Our annual customer seminar in June – The impact of global technology trends on your business, the role of the legal function and what you can do about it today – was oversubscribed.

Increasingly bigger in- house legal and IT teams visit our Wirral Service Delivery Centre to see how people and technology can work seamlessly and effectively. In the last two weeks I’ve been asked three times ‘so when is the iTunes moment in law?’ There will be no one date for the legal equivalent of that iTunes moment. But the direction of travel is very clear and we can already identify the most likely source of this moment: the arrival of category re-defining virtual assistants. The race is on to create virtual assistants that will help customers, whether consumers, small businesses or large corporations, access legal (and other) support and guidance quickly and cost-effectively. They are already here in other areas: Hive, Cortana, Siri  and Indigo. They are emerging in law: ROSS, Amelia, Ravel and Judicata. Like Uber, which owns no taxis, and Airbnb, which owns no bedrooms, these assistants will put knowledge in the hands of customers. They will change where value sits. They will disintermediate large swathes of the current supply chain. This is great news for customers. They are the winners when the iTunes moment hits.

For more information, please contact:

Karl Chapman, Chief Executive, Riverview Law T: 0844 257 0027 E: info@riverviewlaw.com www.riverviewlaw.com

November 2015 Market Horizon Scanning

Welcome to the November 2015 edition of the Riverview Law Market Scanning Report. As part of our market and horizon scanning activities we have always collected and circulated internally relevant legal market articles, commentaries, reports and blogs. When we shared this data with a GC he asked why we didn’t routinely share this with him because he’d find it invaluable. It was a good question! So, we now publish this report which, as you’ll see below, contains links to what we think are the most interesting and relevant legal market commentaries of October 2015 and previous months. Best wishes,

October 2015

Will newbie associates be replaced by Watson? 35% of law firm leaders can envision it http://rv-l.com/1MsqrcD ABA Journal October 26 2015 Life with my robot secretary http://rv-l.com/1Rg2nIb Fast Company October 26 2015 Computer vs. Lawyer? Many Firm Leaders Expect Computers to Win http://rv-l.com/1S90gqm The American Lawyer October 24 2015 Artificial intelligence to radically transform the role of lawyers http://rv-l.com/1RdLhdW Managing Partner October 23 2015 AIG to Launch Data-Driven Legal Ops Business in 2016 http://rv-l.com/1RdLmOP Bloomberg BNA October 20 2015

The Organized Lawyer http://rv-l.com/1RdLzkS SeytLines October 15 2015

Corporate legal departments to give law firms less work in 2016 http://rv-l.com/1GIcEfC Managing Partner October 15 2015

Professor Dr Robot QC http://rv-l.com/1jQx9Ng The Economist October 17 2015

October 2015 Market Horizon Scanning

Welcome to the October 2015 edition of the Riverview Law Market Scanning Report. As part of our market and horizon scanning activities we have always collected and circulated internally relevant legal market articles, commentaries, reports and blogs. When we shared this data with a GC he asked why we didn’t routinely share this with him because he’d find it invaluable. It was a good question! So, we now publish this report which, as you’ll see below, contains links to what we think are the most interesting and relevant legal market commentaries of September 2015 and previous months. Best wishes,

September 2015

The Future of Buying Legal Services http://rv-l.com/1JGgekQ Professor Stephen Mayson September 28 2015

The search for a thinking machine http://rv-l.com/1N4YAz3 BBC News September 17 2015

Intelligent Machines: New York’s super smart AI couple http://rv-l.com/1PQ7nSZ BBC News September 16 2015 Magic-circle law firms to use AI in the next 12-18 months http://rv-l.com/1iPMBbZ Managing Partner September 14 2015 Intelligent Machines: The jobs robots will steal first http://rv-l.com/1JGgroh BBC News September 14 2015

The Napsterization of Legal Services http://rv-l.com/1O5yg6l 3 Geeks and a Law Blog September 13 2015

News You Can Use: A Robot Paralegal? http://rv-l.com/1YRdRqG Advocate’s Studio August 19 2015 At the Inflection Point: the CMO’s Role in Reinventing Law Firm Business Models http://rv-l.com/1FItpqR Kira May 25 2015

Riverview Law launches prototyping consultancy for in-house legal

Riverview Law has today launched a prototyping consultancy to help in-house counsel evolve their legal operating model and develop their own scalable automated processes for legal work. Aimed at large global corporations and mid-sized companies, the consultancy enables customers to build an end-to-end technology-led solution to address their legal needs. Crucially, it will take just four weeks to create a live ‘proof of concept’. The consultancy uses Riverview Law’s proven technology, legal expertise and implementation model to create a solution that encompasses instruction management, triage, case management and document creation, along with activity, quality and risk reporting. The end result is an operating model that ensures legal work is undertaken by the right people, in the right place, in the right way, at the right time and at the right price, whether that work is undertaken in-house or by external providers. It also enables in-house legal functions to establish a clearer understanding as to how technology, workflow automation, reporting and data visualisations can help make their function more effective and efficient on a sustainable basis. This latest development follows Riverview Law’s recent acquisition of CliXLEX, which allowed it to expand its R&D and Client Management Centre in Bridgewater, New Jersey and its partnership with the University of Liverpool to leverage the university’s Artificial Intelligence expertise. Karl Chapman, Chief Executive of Riverview Law, says: “Most businesses are, or are becoming, technology-led. Riverview Law is no exception to this. However, on its own being a technology-led business, from automation and visualisations through to Artificial Intelligence, is of limited value without legal domain expertise. “Riverview Law handles thousands of matters every year for global corporations, mid-sized and fast-growing businesses. We are excited by this addition to our service offering, which we are launching following demand from customers and after running a number of these prototyping sessions with global corporations. The results delivered in four weeks always exceed expectations.”

Equality & Diversity at Riverview Law – Diversity Data 2015

Riverview Law is committed to treating all its team members and job applicants equally and fairly. We are a proud member of the Law Society Diversity & Inclusion Charter.

Riverview Law encourages and values diversity and aims to have a workforce that is representative of the wider community.

These principles of equality and diversity also apply to the manner in which we treat our customers, business partners, suppliers and visitors.

On an annual basis we collect diversity data from our staff. We do not make it compulsory for our staff to provide their diversity data, however we encourage them to send it to us to enable us to monitor and review our diversity arrangements.

A selection of the results of our 2015 diversity data collection survey are displayed below. We have not published any diversity data in a way that might identify individuals.

Age graph

Gender graph

Disability graph

Education graph

Higher education graph

Support graph

Primary carer graph

For further information on Riverview Law’s Equality & Diversity arrangements contact Beth Britton (Equality & Diversity Champion) at bethbritton@riverviewlaw.com.

September 2015 Market Horizon Scanning

Welcome to the September 2015 edition of the Riverview Law Market Scanning Report. As part of our market and horizon scanning activities we have always collected and circulated internally relevant legal market articles, commentaries, reports and blogs. When we shared this data with a GC he asked why we didn’t routinely share this with him because he’d find it invaluable. It was a good question! So, we now publish this report which, as you’ll see below, contains links to what we think are the most interesting and relevant legal market commentaries of August 2015 and previous months. Best wishes,

August 2015

Ides of Maturity reflected in State of Legal Market Report http://rv-l.com/1NN5zfK Beaton Capital August 30 2015 Uber is the new bus http://rv-l.com/1JzSNyk Fast Company August 25 2015 Law and money: Not the usual story http://rv-l.com/1KrqNiD Legal Futures August 25 2015 Lawyers and technology: are firms finally getting to grips with modern tech demands http://rv-l.com/1Jmhpt7 Legal Week August 19 2015 Big Data and the Linguistics of Law http://rv-l.com/1JolpJv Lawyer Watch August 18 2015 Australasian Law Firms Planning for a Digital, Divergent, Differentiated Future http://rv-l.com/1JlBygy Australasian Legal Practice Management Association August 2015 Your Lawyer may soon ask this AI-powered app for legal help http://rv-l.com/1EygqHf Wired July 08 2015

Riverview Law acquires US tech business to advance use of AI in legal market

Riverview Law has acquired New Jersey-based knowledge automation business CliXLEX for an undisclosed sum, as its plans to develop the use of Artificial Intelligence (AI) in the legal market gather pace. The deal is a major step towards the creation of ‘virtual assistants’ that will improve the quality and speed of lawyers’ and paralegal work while freeing them to focus on key tactical and strategic matters. It follows the partnership Riverview Law entered into earlier this year with the University of Liverpool to leverage the university’s Artificial Intelligence expertise. CliXLEX owns and licenses a Knowledge Automation Platform that enables knowledge workers, such as lawyers, with basic Microsoft Office skills to create, automate, maintain and evolve complex end-to-end workflows and processes for all areas of legal, compliance, risk and related activity. The platform manages all activity from instruction, triage, case management, document creation and storage to alert triggers, workflow creation and forensic audit. The CliXLEX technology combines advanced data collection and management, configuration and machine-to-machine learning techniques with a growing level of Artificial Intelligence. The technology integrates seamlessly with third party solutions and is cloud-based although it can also be deployed on premise if required. Critically it has a powerful legacy integration layer toolkit. Riverview Law has worked with CliXLEX for over a year to test the relevance of the platform to the legal market via its managed service and licensed technology offerings to global customers. These tests have proved highly successful showing great potential to deliver significant operational, quality and cost benefits for customers. Combined with Riverview Law’s visualisation and analytics capabilities CliXLEX enhances the existing services Riverview Law provides to customers and accelerates its move into the use of expert systems and Artificial Intelligence. CLiXLEX becomes part of Riverview Law’s group structure and will be based out of the Riverview Law Technology R&D and Client Management Centre in Bridgewater, New Jersey. Richard Yawn, the founder and principal shareholder of CliXLEX becomes a director and Chief Technology Officer of this Riverview Law technology subsidiary. He assumes responsibility for spearheading the further development of the Knowledge Automation Platform and Riverview Law’s investments in Artificial Intelligence, automation and expert systems. Richard has a long track-record in the IT industry, having previously worked with IBM’s Microsoft Practice and as an Enterprise Architect at Aflac. Richard spent the first 13 years of his career developing manufacturing systems using Neural Net and Expert System technologies. Andy Daws, VP North America at Riverview Law, joins this new technology subsidiary as a director and its Chief Customer Officer. Karl Chapman, Chief Executive of Riverview Law, says: “The race is on to provide virtual assistants to knowledge workers, powerful tools that help people and organisations make quicker and better decisions and allow knowledge workers to focus on the key tactical and strategic matters. The legal market is not immune from this trend which will impact all sectors of the economy. “We intend to lead the legal market in providing tools that enable legal and related work to be completed quicker, better and more cost-effectively, whether conducted by lawyers, paralegals, contract managers, risk and compliance officers, or business people.” “This acquisition builds on our significant investments in visualisation and analytics tools, computational argumentation and our Knowledge Transfer Partnership with the University of Liverpool. We expect to make further investments in this area as we evolve and future-proof our business model and at the same time help our customers do the same.” In the UK Riverview Law was advised by the Birmingham office of Gateley plc, and in the US it was advised by the New York office of Gibbons.  

August 2015 Market Horizon Scanning

Welcome to the August 2015 edition of the Riverview Law Market Scanning Report. As part of our market and horizon scanning activities we have always collected and circulated internally relevant legal market articles, commentaries, reports and blogs. When we shared this data with a GC he asked why we didn’t routinely share this with him because he’d find it invaluable. It was a good question! So, we now publish this report which, as you’ll see below, contains links to what we think are the most interesting and relevant legal market commentaries of July 2015 and previous months. Best wishes,

July 2015

The Law Firm of the Future, Part 2: Five Dimensions of Difference http://rv-l.com/1Jc98uQ Thomson Reuters August 11 2015 Legal research pioneers to bring “artificially intelligent attorney” to UK http://rv-l.com/1WhMBR5 Legal Futures August 05 2015 The Law Firm of the Future – What is Needed? http://rv-l.com/1f77egY Thomson Reuters August 05 2015 Law Departments vs. Law Firms: What Innovation Really Looks Like http://rv-l.com/1IYbzuF Legaltech news August 03 2015 Law 2023: A Look Ahead for the Legal Profession http://rv-l.com/1J3hy5C Corcoran Consulting Group July 08 2015 Pricing and analytics: Houston, we have a problem! http://rv-l.com/1NpLjgU Beaton Capital July 07 2015 Full report & interviews: Law 2023 http://rv-l.com/1mZazAC Law 2023 2015

Riverview Law doubles investment in learning and development and awards six training contracts

Riverview Law, the fixed-priced legal services business, is doubling investment in its staff learning and development programme in the next financial year and has awarded six new solicitor training contracts starting in October 2015. Riverview’s new solicitor training programme awarded seven members of staff with a two-year training contract when it launched in September 2014. The latest cohort takes the total number of trainee solicitors at the business to thirteen. Unique to Riverview, the scheme is only open to existing staff and specifically to individuals who have been employed by the business for at least six months and have completed a successful probation period. The new trainees are: Suzanne Betts, Lydia Preece, Mark Rand, Chloe Smith, Sophia Suleman and Ruth Warburton. Riverview Law’s Operations Director, Katy Robson, says: “We are thrilled to be able to build on the success of our inaugural solicitor training scheme and delighted that we are able to offer six more trainee contracts this year. Our strong commitment to staff training and development enables us to cultivate existing talent within our business. We wish our new trainees the best of luck as they start their first year.” Director of Legal Services at Riverview Law, Steven Zdolyny, explains how the business is committed to the ethos of ‘growing our own’: “Recruiting from our existing talent pool means that candidates already fit our business and our values. We have been very open in saying that we believe that the future leaders of Riverview Law are among those in our business today. “As we continue to win blue chip customers and grow existing contracts, we will continue to recruit, train and progress talented people within our business. For this reason, we have doubled the amount that we will invest in our learning and development programme in the next financial year.” Further details about careers at Riverview Law can be found here.

MSU Law Graduate Joins Riverview Law North American Expansion

The below press release was published by Michigan State University on 3rd August 2015. You can read the press release on their website here MSU Law graduate Brian C. Pike,2015, will join Riverview Law’s North American team as the UK-based law firm continues its expansion into the United States legal market. Opening this month, Riverview’s New Jersey office will be close to its existing hub in Manhattan, as well as to the technology and entrepreneurial ecosystem surrounding Princeton University. “With an increasing percentage of our revenues generated outside the UK and a growing U.S. customer base, we’re investing heavily in expanding our stateside presence and market offerings” said Andy Daws, Riverview’s VP North America. “Emerging technologies and next-gen automation are at the core of what we’re doing here, and there are very few law schools producing graduates like Brian who truly understand and embrace that landscape.” Pike was a standout student at MSU Law, a finalist in the ReInvent Law Innovative Ideas Competition and winning the law college’s very first social media contest. He is a certified civil and domestic mediator and a certified Lean design thinker. Pike landed the very first international internship with Riverview Law by tweeting about his interest in being an intern. “Brian is an outstanding ambassador for MSU Law and LegalRnD,” said Daniel W. Linna Jr., Assistant Dean for Career Development and Director of LegalRnD – The Center for Legal Services Innovation. “He excelled in the classroom with MSU Law’s innovative curriculum to develop the 21st Century skills necessary for success in today’s legal industry.” Pike joins Riverview as a Knowledge Automation Architect, a new role reflecting the ease with which knowledge workers such as lawyers are able to use Riverview’s proprietary technology platform to orchestrate and automate end-to-end processes and documents. Our licensed In-House Solutions platform puts control back into the hands of the legal department,” added Daws. “Our platform enables lawyers to automate their own processes and provides real-time data and business insight to help customers make quicker and better decisions. Brian is an ideal candidate to join our pioneering efforts in this field.” Contacts: Daniel W. Linna Jr, Michigan State University College of Law, assistant dean for career development, director of LegalRnD – The Center for Legal Services Innovation, and professor of law in residence Office: 517-432-6934; Email: linnadan@law.msu.edu Andy Daws, Riverview Law, VP North America Office: 212-729-7724 ; Email: andydaws@riverviewlaw.com Michigan State University College of Law successfully prepares graduates for legal employment in settings across the nation. The elective and required curriculum of the College of Law integrates theory and practice, thereby helping to ensure that graduates of MSU Law are well prepared for their first professional positions and their professional responsibilities for decades to come. Riverview Law provides large corporations with a high quality, fixed priced and proven alternative to using traditional law firms and/or growing the size of their in-house legal function. Using client dedicated teams which combine lawyers, client managers, data analysts and other professionals, Riverview Law helps free the internal legal team so that it can evolve its legal operating mode to focus on higher value added strategic and tactical requirements. Riverview Law has three core offerings. It provides managed service solutions via its Legal Advisory Outsourcing services. It licenses to in-house teams its service delivery and workflow platform, which manages instructions into the function, triage, case management and reporting. It provides barrister-led litigation, risk and compliance advice and support. Riverview Law does not practice law in the US. Its US activities are currently focused on R&D, licensed technology and client management.

Case study: David, Legal Manager

Name: David Role: Legal Manager Hours: Full time Customers: The calibre of customer that Riverview works for is excellent – the likes of which are in many respects the preserve of large City law firms. Also, many of Riverview’s customers have a truly global footprint and in all cases transact their business on an international level. The industry sectors that Riverview work across are broad and exciting from FMCG, finance/banking, IT, travel, telecoms to other interesting niche areas. Complexity of work: My work is interesting and complex in nature, regularly involving global supply agreements and dealing with various business partners across the world. The work is also rewarding and important to the customer, such that you can actually see the impact it has within a large global company. For example, this may relate to a global ground transportation agreement, to a master hardware purchase and support agreement or international estates management. Fundamentally, because I act as an extension of the in-house legal team at a large FTSE 100 company, the work is varied and stimulating dealing with both transactional and advisory matters.

The dawn (and the imminent explosion) of AI in law and legal services

By Steven Malyj, Trainee Solicitor at Riverview Law Towards the end of last year I watched a TEDSalon talk delivered by Kenneth Cukier to a Berlin audience in June 2014.  During the talk Cukier referred to machine learning and the advent of the self-driving car – how the approach to this was evolving from the challenge of explaining to a machine how to drive (think Hugh Jackman teaching the robot how to box in Real Steel), to a state where we provide the facts and the machine teaches itself (Cukier 2014).  It seemed like a fanciful notion and as I listened I imagined hauliers, taxi drivers and white van men going about their day blissfully unaware of the pending implications that this technology may have on their future.  Surely, now that the UK Government has unveiled its plans to invest almost £19 million in the road legal testing of driverless cars between now and 2020, these workers will begin to fret for their livelihoods.  Then, in January 2015 Riverview Law announced a Knowledge Transfer Partnership (‘KTP’) with the University of Liverpool to (among other things) draw on a pool of skilled data scientists and ground breaking Artificial Intelligence (‘AI’) with the aim of automating some of the cognitive abilities of knowledge workers and provide organisations with intelligent decision support tools. In a momentary panic, the palpitations began, my palms became clammy and I started to picture myself cueing up with aforementioned motorists to ‘sign on’.  But what does it really mean?  Where will AI really take the workforce?  This article investigates the dawn (and the imminent explosion) of AI in law and legal services and dispels the myth that new technology will signify the end for lawyers; positing rather that this is merely a new beginning, bringing with it a host of new opportunities for myself and my learned friends. I think we can take it as read by now that law firms, traditionally, are resistant to change; or that is at least how it reads on the face of things.  Some of us (myself included) may think it is more the case that law firms are not resistant, they are incapableOf the 304 respondents to the Altman Weil Law Firms in Transition survey of 2014 (Altman Weil, Inc 2014) the overwhelming consensus opined that the legal market had changed in fundamental ways, 67% of them predicted that the rate of change will only increase, but only 13% expressed any confidence in their firm’s ability to change or to at least keep pace with changes (Georgetown Law 2015).  With that in mind, it is perhaps no surprise that technology has not permeated ‘our world’ with any real pace, so before the critics among us nonchalantly snub the future of legal technology as some sort of urban legend – a bed time story about jurisprudential robots that will sneak into our office and steal our desks – it may be worthwhile briefly examining the application of AI in other fields. It should be enough to refer you to the household names of Amazon and Netflix and the way they use machine learning to suggest books and movies that you may be interested in; or how Facebook and LinkedIn can suggest people that you might know or wish to connect with.  No?  Okay, in October 2012, Geoffrey Hinton and a team of 4 doctoral students won a competition aimed at designing automated drug detection systems.  These systems use algorithms to analyse data sets and identify particular molecules that will bind to targets and therefore make for effective treatments. Interestingly, the competition ran for 60 days, but Hinton and his team did not enter the competition until the last two weeks.  Even more interestingly, neither Hinton nor his compadres had any background whatsoever in Chemistry, Biology or Life Sciences.  They even beat off competition from all of the algorithms developed by Merck – one of the largest pharmaceutical companies in the world.  Hinton and his team achieved this accolade using Deep Learning; a process that attempts to mimic the neural connections of the human brain, processing data in much the same way.  I firmly believe that this is an amazing fete of technology and a sure sign of things to come – law is incredibly complex in its own right, but I defy anybody not to agree that it is at least paralleled by modern medicine and if 5 people with no subject matter expertise can outperform industry leaders then why can it not happen in law?  Make no mistake, machine learning and AI will go everywhere and it will happen at an alarming rate from herein. Applications of machine learning are certainly serving to further the principles of Moore’s Law – the theory that over time the pace of technological advances will increase on an exponential curve.  Figure 1[1] shows how Moore’s Law is progressing. Accelerating pace of change The graph shows that right about now, the processing power of modern technology has surpassed the processing power of a mouse’s brain and that by circa 2025 it will surpass the processing power of the human brain. Now, Moore’s Law isn’t ‘real law’.  It’s not grounded in hard science and empirical facts.  Moore’s Law was a simple observation by Gordon Moore in 1965 that the number of transistors per square inch on integrated circuits roughly doubled each year since the invention of the integrated circuit and predicted that the trend would continue this way.  Looking at the historical plots on the chart, it was quite the prediction, so can we really say that more is not to come?  And quickly at that? What, then, for law?  The use of AI in law is not really a new concept; the first International Conference on AI and Law was held in Boston on 27th – 29th May 1987 and it has been held on every odd numbered year since then.  In 1988 Philip Capper and Richard Susskind didn’t just co-author Latent Damage Law: The Expert System, they developed a piece of software that could guide lawyers through “a dense web of barely intelligible interrelated rules” (Susskind 2014). The system mapped over 2 million paths that would guide lawyers to an informed solution and it was all extrapolated from the mind of one expert lawyer; it was so good that it was considered better than Capper and it was able to reduce the time that it took a lawyer to do this work from 10 hours to just 10 minutes.  But this was a very niche field and so perhaps it is understandable as to why the impact on the legal sector wasn’t what we would call earth shattering.  Further, to extrapolate that technique across the whole of the industry would take a great deal of initiative and inclination to gather the best minds in each field of law for as long as it takes to transfer their knowledge to a system.  We need systems that can learn, spot patterns, understand language and context and adapt. Germany’s Federal Government have recently deployed an AI application which makes automated decisions regarding citizens’ claims for child benefit.  The system is able to assess claims made by citizens by interpreting the justifications that they put forward in their application and determining whether these justifications merit the award of the benefit(s) claimed (Hodson 2013).  I cannot attest to the grounds for awarding child benefit in Germany or the means and criteria by which such claims are assessed, but I suspect that it is safe to say, like in the UK, that such claims are not straightforward and will include the opportunity for the claimant to provide details of extenuating circumstances and any other relevant information to support their claim and so on. What we have here is an example of an advancement in technology from Capper and Susskind’s method of man teaches machine – machine guides skilled operator, to an instance where man tells the machine the basics – machine learns, understands and operates itself.  The cynic here would shout at the top of their lungs “this will cost real people their jobs”. The optimist (particularly from a UK perspective) might well counter the cynic by pointing to the time it takes to process claims, deal with challenges and respond to the ever increasing backlog of queries – it is fair to say that government organisations are reticent to increase staffing just because the number of claims increases; so, if we take the first step of a claim out of the hands of the human workforce, that workforce is freed up to spend more time quality assuring, assessing challenges and queries and providing the sound customer service that the clients are so often crying out for. In Helsinki, TrademarkNow is a relatively new start up firm offering a web based trademark management platform that can provide instant trademark search results in as quick as 15 seconds (shaving days off the traditional trademark search methods), provide automated and relevant watch alerts and allow users wider watch capabilities (TrademarkNow 2015).  If you consider the amount of data in existence with regard to trademark and intellectual property – all those companies, all those trademarks, logos and brands – is it any wonder that this area of law has been among the first to see the exploitation of automated systems?  The standard approach to conducting a trademark search is a detailed review of the proposed brand, potential names and whether any other companies exist.  But lawyers will appreciate that it doesn’t end there – we need to consider whether there is any similarity with other brands; after all our clients don’t want to potentially face a claim for passing off simply by virtue of the fact that their customers might mistake the product for another brand altogether.  This is where TrademarkNow gets interesting, because it will go beyond the generic search, beyond even a search for similar names and brands based on phonetics, colour or make up; in the event of a potential match, Trademark now uses AI to review that particular match’s history of defending its brand, producing a risk profile and an analysis of the likelihood that the proposed brand will make it onto the trademark register. Lex Machina is a Stanford based company that offers data analytics tools to lawyers in the field of IP litigation.  Consider a typical approach to litigation – the client comes to you with a claim that another party has infringed their intellectual property rights in whatever product or service they offer to their customers (or, similarly, that another party has accused your client of infringing their intellectual property rights).  You take their information, you use your understanding of commercial law and intellectual property interspersed with research from a handful of cases and you assess the merits of their claim or defence.  Lex Machina toss aside the merits of the claim.  Instead they use data analytics to analyse the behaviour of opposition, counsel and judges across a range factors to provide a forecast result.  Put simply, it has the potential to accurately predict the outcome of a case with a much greater degree of certainty than any human, because it has the time; it has the inclination (that is to say as far as it is possible for a machine to possess such a trait); and it has the ability to analyse huge volumes of data that a lawyer just would not have the time to conduct (unless of course the client is happy to pay them their hourly rate – and then some – to do so).  It has quite aptly been dubbed “Moneyball for Lawyers” (Doherty 2014). I feel that it is necessary again to come back to the worry that AI, in practice, will spell cuts for lawyers.  To the contrary, Anna Ronkainen (the co-founder of TrademarkNow) disagrees with any assertion that AI is only going to add a fifth horseman to the Apocalypse – I’m thinking Lady Justice bursting through the flames on a mighty chariot and striking down lawyers left, right and centre.  Instead, Ronkainen suggests that AI will allow lawyers to focus on more meaningful tasks by eliminating manual work, which brings us back to the point of lowering the cost of the service to clients while at the same time increasing its value (Ronkainen 2015).  She further notes how the UK “is at the global forefront of this development with professional liberalisation initiatives such as Alternative Business Structures…” (Ronkainen 2015). I am largely inclined to agree with Ronkainen.  More to the point, I continue to be excited by the ever changing face of legal technology and I am privileged to work with an organisation that is not only fully prepared to embrace these changes, but is also exploiting the potential that it holds for lawyers and making a conscious effort to dispel the fears that it will reduce the workforce.  To the cynics and the optimists alike, we can only say “watch this space”. Bibliography Altman Weil, Inc. Law Firms in Transition: An Altman Weil Flash Survey. Prods. Thomas S Clay, & Eric A Seeger. Pennsylvania, 2014. Big Data is Better Data. Directed by TED Salon. Performed by Kenneth Cukier. 2014. Doherty, Sean. “Moneyball for Lawyers.” Law Technology News, April 2014. Georgetown Law. 2015 Report on the State of the Legal Market. Georgetown Law, 2015. Hodson, Hal. “AI Gets Involved with the Law.” New Scientist, 2013: 20. Ronkainen, Anna. “Don’t Rage Against the Machine.” Intellectual Property Magazine, March 2015. Future of Artificial Intelligence and Law. Performed by Richard Susskind. ReInvent Law, 2014. TrademarkNow. TrademarkNow. May 2015. https://www.trademarknow.com/ (accessed May 2015). [1] http://www.reddit.com/r/singularity/comments/2xu2sx/moores_law_2015_mouse_brain_has_been_reached/

Case Study: Janne, Commercial Lawyer

Name: Janne Role: Commercial Lawyer Hours: Part time Background: I am a 12 years qualified Solicitor. I trained in London then moved to the North West. I spent 4 years as an employment Solicitor then moved to practice banking and finance before joining Riverview Law in October 2013. Customers: The calibre of customer that Riverview Law works with is excellent. I work for a FTSE 100 business so for me the calibre is the same as when I worked at Hill Dickinson in Liverpool. Role: I work for a global banking customer at Riverview Law. On a daily basis I review key contracts and assess the risks involved and/or identify any gaps that exist between the contacts and the banks standard / template documents. Complexity of work: I generally work on the most complex matters but I assist with providing quality assurance for more junior members of the team and less complex work. Career prospects, development and learning opportunities: Riverview Law has a great balance. There is no pressure to get promoted (unlike in private practice) but if you want to reach for the stars the opportunities are right there for you. There are opportunities coming thick and fast and if you want to develop and learn you can do no better than join Riverview Law. Flexible working: The flexible working hours have assisted me immeasurably! I have two young daughters and have been able to maintain my career and career prospects while still spending lots of time being a Mum. When my children are older my circumstances will have changed but I will not have had years out of the legal market. On the contrary I am right at the heart of it, in an incredibly dynamic environment and the balance for me as a lawyer and a Mum could not be better. I feel incredibly fortunate to work in such a flexible environment.    

Case Study: Richard, Legal Manager

Name: Richard Role: Legal Manager Hours: Full time Background:  Qualified Solicitor and Legal Manager responsible for a team of 26 staff dealing with global commercial contracts for a FTSE 100 customer. I trained in Chester and latterly worked in Liverpool advising businesses on commercial matters. Career prospects, development and learning opportunities: The development of the team is critical to the success of Riverview Law. Karl Chapman (CEO) regularly reminds the team that the future leaders of the business will be grown from within and this highlights how importantly the Board takes the development of the Riverview Law employees. As well as the normal CPD courses that Solicitors attend, we have our own internal training which is specifically tailored to the needs of the employees and we are currently rolling out a comprehensive Learning and Development Program covering not only legal development but also training in other additional skills necessary for people and business management. In addition, we currently have 7 Trainee Solicitors with a further 10 opportunities this year, we have a Legal Apprentice and there are regularly promotion opportunities across the business which will only increase as we grow. All of this is testament to how important Riverview Law holds the learning and development of its staff, particularly in the context that we are not yet 4 years old!  

Case Study: Deepak, Legal Manager

Name: Deepak Role: Legal Manager Hours: Full time Background: Before joining Riverview I spent 10 years practicing banking and securitisation law at Jones Day, a US firm based in London.  My practice focused on representing lenders as well as corporates and issuers in trade receivables, inventory finance, structured securities, and cross-border securitisations. I acted predominantly on the lender side for global banking customers. Customers: The calibre of customers, both actual and potential, is of the very highest quality.  Every customer that we currently act for is either a FTSE 100 company or an internationally recognised household name.  One of the things that surprised me the most when I switched from my previous role was that the quality and sophistication of the customers that I have the pleasure of acting for did not diminish; in fact the amount of exposure I gained to GC level contacts increased. Role: The teams I manage act for a global bank on two large, regulatory led compliance projects.  The teams analyse the bank’s legacy contracts by reference to a number of due diligence data points which allows the bank and its regulators to assess contractual exposures to key suppliers.  The outputs from these projects are used by the bank to ensure compliance within the regulatory matrix within which they operate but also as a means by which to assess the commercial content of their existing agreements, with a view to deriving maximum value from them. A key part of the role is to ensure consistency and coherence of reporting to the customer but another important element, and one of the most gratifying aspects, is the opportunity to work with, coach and offer training to young lawyers at the outset of their careers. Complexity of work: The legacy contracts that the team analyse cover the full spectrum of supply side agreements that a global entity might enter into and the complexity of the work we do varies accordingly.  In fact that is one of the most engaging aspects of the role.  In my previous guise I advised on a number of matters that were between £500m and £1 billion in value and were considered market leading but I can honestly say that it’s been a long time since I’ve felt as intellectually engaged as I have been since joining Riverview! Career prospects, development and learning opportunities: The career prospects at Riverview Law are limitless – we set our own horizons here. I’ve worked for an international law firm and have been on secondment at an investment bank but I would say that none offered as considered, structured and strategic learning and development programs as we do.  The thought, time and effort that goes into putting together training plans is nothing short of remarkable. Flexible working: The flexible working hours aspect of the role is, in my opinion, one of the most important benefits Riverview offers to its employees and one of the key things that distinguish us from other employers.

Case Study: Debbie, Solicitor

Name: Debbie Role: Solicitor Hours: Part time

Background: Solicitor, qualified in 1986. Worked mainly in contract and procurement since I qualified, for a shipping company, major electricity supplier, and public authority. I’ve been at Riverview for just over a year and have worked on one of the accounts for a FTSE 100 business. Customers: I only have personal experience of one customer, which is a FTSE 100 business and is a very large player in the financial market. I am aware that other Riverview customers are large organisations with significant assets and on that basis, the Riverview customers appear to be financially sound. On this account I deal with contract based matters, Statements of Work’s, Non-Disclosure Agreements and contractual matters of varying complexity, along with an increasing number of risk reviews and gap analyses, and appraisal and consideration of standard and individualised contracts. More recently, we have seen in increase in non-transactional work and drafted clauses widely used in contract templates. My role also involves the quality assurance of more junior staff work. Complexity of work: Some work is fairly straightforward, but increasingly the volume and the complexity of the work is becoming more significant. Many contracts/terms/documents are long detailed and complicated, requiring reviews of and advice on significant risks and liabilities. Career prospects, development and learning opportunities: Riverview are very positive about recruitment and development of staff generally. They encourage employees to develop their skills and this contributes to their ability to progress within the business. Riverview are very pro-active in encouraging staff members to share knowledge with other staff, and have a robust Learning and Development program in place. Flexible working: The ability to work flexible hours at Riverview Law has assisted me greatly. That was one of the things that attracted me to Riverview. They have a very positive attitude to flexible working wherever possible.  

Case Study: Angela, Legal Manager

Name: Angela Role: Legal Manager Hours: Full time

Background:  I completed my training contract at DLA Piper in Manchester, then qualified into the Projects team at Addleshaw Goddard in 2006.  I moved to McGrigors in 2008 (which was a mid-size national firm, with a new Manchester office) and was promoted to Senior Associate in 2012.  McGrigors later merged with Pinsent Masons, where I worked until joining Riverview in October 2013. My experience before Riverview was focused on long-term, bespoke public-private partnership models (acting primarily for house builders and local authorities). I joined Riverview Law in October 2013 as I was looking for somewhere with a different culture to a large national law firm, where I could enjoy a good work-life balance while continuing to grow and challenge myself professionally.  After joining Riverview, I was almost immediately seconded to a FTSE 100 business to work full time in their legal team, which was my role for 15 months, until January 2015.  This was a fabulous opportunity to work in-house for a global organisation, and included a lot of interesting legal work.  I learnt a lot in that time and really enjoyed the work and the people.  The highlight of my secondment was a week-long business trip to Mexico (as our customer’s sole legal representative) to negotiate and finalise a complex long-term services agreement. I currently manage a team of 11 Business Law Executives / Solicitors in relation to a large financial compliance contract review project, which is a great opportunity to develop my people management skills.  The team are great and everyone pulls together to deliver a great service for our customer. Customers: The calibre of customer at Riverview Law is excellent.  We work for a number of global organisations and household names (which came as quite a surprise to me when I found out who they were!). Role: I manage a team of 11 people who review and report on a wide range of commercial agreements, as part of a significant compliance project for a global bank. Complexity of work:  While on secondment, I led on the negotiation of 10 year global framework agreements, and also local agreements in relation to services to be provided in the USA, Canada, France, Mexico and Turkey (amongst others) – which was excellent quality work. In my new role, the contracts we review and report on can be extremely complex with lots of bespoke drafting, or they can be more “standard” agreements on the bank’s standard terms.  We review all kinds of commercial agreements, so the complexity varies significantly on a contract by contract basis.  This allows our team members to gain a solid understanding of commercial agreements, and keeps the work stimulating and challenging. Career prospects, development and learning opportunities: Riverview offers everyone the opportunity to develop their own careers in the way they would like to develop them.  As a solicitor, I really like that fact that there isn’t the usual “single track” option of “making it” (or not!) as a Partner at Riverview – and we certainly don’t operate in a hierarchical way, as your typical traditional law firm might.  I find it really refreshing that a lawyer could apply for a Client Manager (non-legal) role here, for example, and for it not to be seen as a “step down”.  Riverview offers me the opportunity to continually challenge and develop myself professionally.  There is also a lot of change here, as we are growing really quickly, so there is always an opportunity to get involved in a new role or project, which keeps it exciting! I have been very fortunate in my time at Riverview in being given the opportunity to work in-house for the first time (on a secondment basis), which allowed me to develop and learn a great deal about how in-house legal teams work, and how they interact with their commercial colleagues in the business to get deals done.  The company also supports people who want to move between accounts / teams for a new challenge, which means that you can continually challenge yourself and learn new things.  Riverview allows everyone to drive their own careers in whatever direction they want– so you can aim for whatever role you want in the business and go for it! Flexible working: Before I joined Riverview, I worked in a series of large national firms, where it was unusual to leave the office on time, and the culture was to work long hours and record lots of chargeable time in order to meet your billing targets.  Here, there are no chargeable-hours targets, which allows everyone to just focus on doing a really good job for the customer (rather than worrying about how much time you have spent on a matter or how much you have billed).  It also means that I can make plans at the evening and stick to them, and be confident that my weekend plans won’t be overtaken by work demands.  We work hard, and might work late from time to time when needs be, but late nights are definitely not the norm.  I now have a good work-life balance, which I was starting to think just wouldn’t be possible as a lawyer!  I have never looked back!

July 2015 Market Horizon Scanning

Welcome to the July 2015 edition of the Riverview Law Market Scanning Report. As part of our market and horizon scanning activities we have always collected and circulated internally relevant legal market articles, commentaries, reports and blogs. When we shared this data with a GC he asked why we didn’t routinely share this with him because he’d find it invaluable. It was a good question! So, we now publish this report which, as you’ll see below, contains links to what we think are the most interesting and relevant legal market commentaries of June 2015 and previous months. Best wishes,

The Riverview Law R&D Team

June 2015 Riverview Law Annual Market Horizon Scanning Seminar videos and slides http://rv-l.com/1GbVUGc June 19 2015

Lawyers, Cabbies, and Uber http://rv-l.com/1RokBer Bloomberg BNA July 02 2015

Robots on the march http://rv-l.com/1elWDPc BBC Technology July 02 2015

Do Less Law – Redefining Value in the Delivery of Legal Services http://rv-l.com/1LW9iWo Corcoran Consulting Group June 02 2015

LFaaS (Law Firm as a Service) III – AI and the shape of law to come http://rv-l.com/1LWaedg Lexology June 01 2015

The legal profession’s Kodak moment? http://rv-l.com/1KUxJnG Lexology 2015

June 2015 Market Horizon Scanning

Welcome to the June 2015 edition of the Riverview Law Market Scanning Report. As part of our market and horizon scanning activities we have always collected and circulated internally relevant legal market articles, commentaries, reports and blogs. When we shared this data with a GC he asked why we didn’t routinely share this with him because he’d find it invaluable. It was a good question! So, we now publish this report which, as you’ll see below, contains links to what we think are the most interesting and relevant legal market commentaries of May 2015 and previous months. Best wishes,

The Riverview Law R&D Team

May 2015 Calculated risks: Will algorithms make business boring? http://rv-l.com/1F3TKIl BBC Business May 12 2015 Can the Law Keep Up with Robots? http://rv-l.com/1AWMYsY The Law School, The University of Chicago May 18 2015 What does the attendance at CodeX say about BigLaw?  http://rv-l.com/1Acqcgr Beaton Capital May 19 2015

Stop Calling Legal Service Professionals “Non-Lawyers” http://rv-l.com/1dq5eQh Thomson Reuters May 19 2015

How afraid of Watson the Robot Should We Be? http://rv-l.com/1cG6cr2 New York, News & Politics May 20 2015

Silicon Valley has become a dream factory http://rv-l.com/1HWcYSc Financial Times May 20 2015

Robots Will Overtake People Within 25 Years, Astronomer Royal Warns http://rv-l.com/1MhH9GY Yahoo News May 22 2015

Robots and the Law http://rv-l.com/1MB93OR Slaw May 25 2015 How Lawyers can survive the AI-pocalypse http://rv-l.com/1Kk9CNS 3 Geeks and a Law Blog May 26 2015 Harvard medical professor: Big data and analytics help cure cancer http://rv-l.com/1F3U89R ZDNet May 30 2015    

Riverview Law to expand its Wirral Centre and open a second US office following contract wins with global businesses

Following new contract wins and the expansion of its work with its existing FTSE100 and global customers Riverview Law, the fixed-priced legal services business, is expanding its Wirral Centre which already has nearly 100 team members. It has commenced a new recruitment drive to attract lawyers, and other professionals, from the Chester, Liverpool, Wirral and North-Wales areas.

Riverview Law has also announced that it is opening a second US office to support the significant growth it is experiencing. Opening on 1 August 2015, the New Jersey office will be close to its existing hub in Manhattan, as well as to the technology and entrepreneurial ecosystem surrounding Princeton University.

These developments follow a period of rapid growth which has seen the launch of Riverview Law In-House Solutions which enables customers to license Riverview Law technology, the creation of a separate technology business, and an Artificial Intelligence Partnership with the University of Liverpool.

Katy Robson, Operations Director, says: “Having built solid foundations over the last three years we are expanding rapidly with our sales growing at c100% pa. We can provide our team and new joiners with a long-term, secure career in a rapidly growing business that is helping to change the legal market. Anyone who is looking to work in a positive, innovative, professional and fun environment, whilst working on engaging and challenging work, should call us.”

Andy Daws, Vice President, North America at Riverview Law, says: “Our US expansion, focused on business development for customers wanting access to the English courts, client management and technology, is a testament to our customer-centric business model. Working with our IT and legal colleagues in the UK, we’re transitioning from a tech-enabled to a tech-led business. We’re using existing and emerging technologies to develop easy to use solutions with unrivalled analytics capabilities, all designed to help our own teams and our customers make better and quicker decisions.”

If you are interested in a career at Riverview Law you can learn more about the roles available and what it’s like to work at Riverview Law Join Us.

May 2015 Market Horizon Scanning

Welcome to the May 2015 edition of the Riverview Law Market Scanning Report. As part of our market and horizon scanning activities we have always collected and circulated internally relevant legal market articles, commentaries, reports and blogs. When we shared this data with a GC he asked why we didn’t routinely share this with him because he’d find it invaluable. It was a good question! So, we now publish this report which, as you’ll see below, contains links to what we think are the most interesting and relevant legal market commentaries of April 2015 and previous months. Best wishes,

The Riverview Law R&D Team

April 2015

IBM and Samsung Want To Use Blockchains With Everything http://rv-l.com/1EScZb5 Coinbuzz January 2015

A Kodak moment for the legal profession http://rv-l.com/1Ik8EzS Lexology March 24 2015

Legal Technology 3.0 http://rv-l.com/1KOA1lo Huffington Post April 06 2015 #LegalLean… coming to the legal services ecosystem near you? http://rv-l.com/1Jtinmf Beaton Capital April 08 2015 Holmes and Watson – How Artificial Intelligence is Changing Law http://rv-l.com/1Klipwr Digital Journal April 23 2015

Will Powerful Technology Replace Lawyers? http://rv-l.com/1Klh8We Bloomberg BNA May 01 2015

Walking with the new legal giants http://rv-l.com/1bZJxFW Karl Chapman May 05 2015

Walking with the new legal giants

CodeX FutureLaw Conference 2015: Stanford Law School Karl Chapman, Chief Executive, Riverview Law, 5 May 2015

Being an intruder

In the last few years I’ve led a business in the legal market for the first time; Riverview Law was launched on 20 February 2012. Unsurprisingly perhaps, I’ve often felt like an outsider, an intruder. The language, the behaviours, the myths. The aura surrounding the rule of law, law firms and lawyers. Those real and imaginary barriers carefully constructed over generations. At first I rationalised my feelings as those of the newcomer; with all the advantages and disadvantages that this brings. All I had to do, I thought, was to listen and learn. I’d soon work out what was happening. After all, I’d had similar feelings when we entered the recruitment market in 1989 and the HR Advisory Outsourcing market in 2000. As with law, these were markets in which we had no previous experience before we set up our businesses. We just saw big markets, at change points, with unsatisfied customer demand and a fragmented and undercapitalised supply chain. We saw opportunity that we could hopefully realise by keeping things simple, and by focusing on delivering a great service to customers at a fair price. We were prepared to take calculated risks and back our judgments with capital, energy and experimentation. But this time it is different. Fundamentally so. My time at the excellent CodeX 2015 crystallised why.

Law 3.0

As I relax on a flight back to London, with Pink Floyd’s wonderful ‘Wish you were here’ album stimulating my thoughts, I realise that CodeX has given me some language, much of it pinched from the excellent speakers and delegates (thank you!), to articulate what my colleagues and I have felt for a couple of years. Thoughts that have consciously and unconsciously driven us and Riverview Law forward. Thoughts and themes that now draw together well. The opening address at CodeX was delivered by Professor Oliver Goodenough. His subject was “The State of the Art of Legal Technology Circa 2015.” He gave an overview of legal technology, focusing on the various systemic changes confronting the law and legal practice. However, it was how he described the different technological approaches that the various stakeholders in the legal system have been adopting to respond to these changes that made things click. To make his point he kept it simple, using the now clichéd, but as he rightly said still useful terms of 1.0, 2.0 and 3.0. His summary was (and apologies to Oliver if I’ve misquoted him):

  • In Law 1.0 technology empowers the current human players within the current system;
  • In Law 2.0 technology becomes disruptive because it replaces an increasing number of the human players, but again within the current system and operating model; but
  • In Law 3.0 we see a radical re-design and, to a greater or lesser extent, the replacement of the current system with a new system driven by the power of computational technology and new entrants.

The real storm is yet to arrive

Of course, this transition can be applied to any number of other markets; the impact of on-line shopping on retailing, automation in car manufacturing, Uber and airbnb. But there are some catches here for legal, and not just the obvious ones that most incumbents are largely stuck in 1.0, and that many new entrants (particularly the technology companies) are looking to substitute them and deliver Law 3.0 rather than help incumbents become Law 2.0. Many (particularly lawyers) would argue that the legal market is facing something like a perfect storm in the UK following the Legal Services Act 2007, the economic melt-down in 2008, the increasing shift in buying power to the customer and increased competition. But I have always thought that this is a narrow and flawed analysis. Firstly, it confuses regulatory and economic events as the key drivers. In practice the really big themes are that customers have, finally, had enough, and technology is changing the rules of engagement. Put simply, consumers and businesses have paid too much for legal services and there is a crisis in access to justice. Secondly, and most critically, it identifies the wrong date. It wasn’t 2007/2008 that triggered the perfect storm. The seeds for the coming big storm, because today is just a minor shower compared with what happens next, were planted in 1989 when Tim Berners-Lee created the first web browser. The big problem for the legal industry is that it is now having to fight on two fronts, not that many players recognise this. Yes, it is experiencing its own vertical market re-structuring which is driving Law 1.0 to Law 2.0. (about time); and a lot of the legal sector here and in the US is not well positioned to manage this single challenge given the partnership model, weak balance sheets and the culture of law firms. However, and some might say unluckily, at the same time the legal market has to contend with a technology revolution that is profound and which will impact all sectors of the economy. A revolution that has been over 25 years in the making and which saw Time Berners-Lee invent the internet in 1989,  the first commercial web browser in 1993 (Mosaic), the dotcom boom and bust between 1995 and 2000, the creation of Google in 2008 … A revolution that spans big data, through the cloud  to artificial intelligence. To keep things simple, and focusing on its consequences, its output, I’ll describe this revolution as ‘the rise of the knowledge worker’ (see below). Because it is ill prepared, this cocktail of a vertical market change-point with a technology revolution represents a unique challenge for legal incumbents. Even though many incumbents will suffer in all sectors of the economy, other sectors have had a head start when compared with legal. Over the last decade players in other sectors have come to understand real competition and have had to innovate and become agile to succeed. They have invested heavily in technology and automation, whereas legal has not. Most legal technology investment has either been on billing systems, so that six minute units can be recorded accurately, or on IT such as legal practice management systems that attempt to make the existing 1.0 model more efficient.

The rise of the knowledge worker

The technological revolution we’re living through will affect all of us and impact all sectors of the economy and society. Its language includes many current buzz words; big data, the internet of things, expert systems, deep automation, artificial intelligence, blockchains, computational law, the cloud. However, and cutting through the terminology to focus on its practical consequences, one of the key themes in this period will be the rise of the knowledge worker. This is a trend that is as irresistible and as profound as the move from mainframes to PCs, and the impact of mobile and the internet on the way we live and work. The race is on to provide knowledge workers with the tools and virtual assistants that enable them to do a lot of the work today that historically has been done by ‘professionals’, whether they are IT developers, lawyers, HR advisers … etc. We are witnessing the flattening of organisations and the empowering of knowledge workers. We will also see tools put in the hands of customers (whether individuals or businesses) that traditionally were used by professional intermediaries whether in medical, financial, legal or other areas. For example, in the very near future knowledge workers, in any function, who are the subject matter experts and who are closest to the customer and/or business need, will be able to undertake activities that previously required IT departments, change control, IT developers and software houses. Changes that took significant time and cost to deliver; we all have war stories about the difficulty and frustrations of trying to change enterprise wide platforms for even the simplest purposes! Using a legal example as a proxy, imagine that a knowledge worker in a legal team, whose only IT expertise is their ability to use Microsoft Office, can quickly build, maintain and evolve an end-to-end customer, local or complex global workflow and process including: (a)    Instruction management (what legal support, if any, does the individual / business unit actually need?); through (b)   Triage (if legal support is required who should it be undertaken by, internally or externally, given the requirement and its risk, time, cost profile?); to (c)    Case management and document creation (how can the matter be managed consistently, using the right documents and with the appropriate data captured consistently, whoever is doing the work?); and (d)   Reporting and Analytics (how is real time activity published so resource can be managed, and how are trends and data mining undertaken to pre-empt future risk, reduce cost, evolve the operating model?). This redefines the traditional IT and business operating model. It changes the way legal and other functions operate. This model is available today. We already operate this way in Riverview Law by deploying easy to use expert systems, automation, Artificial Intelligence and analytics. Internally we call this the ‘configuration not coding’ revolution; using knowledge workers with easy to use configuration tools to manage day-to-day requirements rather than IT developers with programming skills. Yes, we still need IT programmers. Yes, we still need lawyers and other professionals. But their focus changes. IT programmers help build the tools and platforms that unleash knowledge workers and the business. Lawyers start to play the real added value parts in the legal process. This approach also helps us and our customers address the absolutely critical need for accurate data. In the ‘big (medium or small) data’ debate, if data (content) is king, the ability to properly understand and apply it (context) is the kingdom. Of course, the keys to the kingdom include capturing the data accurately, consistently, and easily in real-time. Which neatly brings us all the way back to workflows and processes which need to be automated and amended easily, quickly and cost-effectively, by knowledge workers, so that they reflect business needs.

Parallel universes

This all partly explains the challenges we sometimes experience at Riverview Law as we engage with the legal industry. With notable exceptions, in particular our conversations with in-house teams and a few legal leaders who ‘get it’, it has felt as if two conversations have been occurring in parallel. On one side are the current legal players (Law 1.0) with their pre-occupation with PEP, lateral hires, international expansion, mergers and, particularly in the US, maintaining the regulatory status quo. Their focus is on using IT to improve their current operating and business model. Their pre-occupation is with Law 1.0 and a desire, on the part of many, to delay Law 2.0. On the other side are the new entrants, including technology companies and businesses like Riverview Law (and some in-house teams), who have brought disciplines, business models and technology from other sectors. These players are focused not just on creating a profitable Law 2.0 platform but also on using this platform to transition quickly to Law 3.0. They, we, use the language of the customer, the culture of one team, and the application of existing and emerging technologies including automation, analytics and computational argumentation to drive quality and improve efficiency. It is no surprise that it is law firms buying law firms (a Law 1.0 Law 2.0 strategy). Why would new entrants or technology companies encumber themselves with legacy when the future requires a different model? It is also no surprise that in-house teams are adopting technology faster than most of the supply chain.

What an opportunity

Of course, for legal there is a big irony in all this. Over many decades the legal market has not been subjected to the same competitive pressures that other sectors of the economy have experienced. Whatever lawyers and law firms may think they have benefitted from protective regulations that enabled excess profits. This, inevitably, injected complacency in many of its incumbents and reduced innovation and creativity. The irony is that the very regulation that protected Law 1.0 firms has also sown the seeds for their substitution as Law 2.0 and, more critically, Law 3.0 models takeover. It would be difficult for many law firms to respond to the emerging competition in the legal vertical anyway, but when this is combined with technology upheaval all bets are off. But this does not mean that there aren’t great opportunities, because there are. It also doesn’t mean that some Law 1.0 players won’t successfully transition to Law 2.0 and Law 3.0, because some will. The legal market is a global market and, as with all markets, there is no silver bullet and there is no one-size-fits-all model that will succeed. Moreover, in England and Wales we have been dealt a good hand by our legislators and regulators. If we can combine the best of our regulatory model with the best of existing and emerging technologies, particularly those coming out of the US, then we are in a good position to dominate the global legal market in the first half of this century. By focusing on Law 3.0 and working with Silicon Valley we can become the new legal giants. What a great time to be a technology-led legal services business. Thank you CodeX, I will be back.

Riverview Law to award up to 10 training contracts in 2015

Riverview Law, the fixed-priced legal services business, has opened applications for its 2015 solicitor training scheme, in which up to 10 training contracts will be awarded to current members of staff. This is the second year the business will be offering training contracts since becoming an ABS in 2014 with seven being awarded last year. Director of Legal Services, Steven Zdolyny, said Riverview is committed to training employees throughout all areas of the business: ‘As we continue to grow and win business with global corporations it is important we recruit, develop and progress the talent within Riverview Law. By offering opportunities such as training contracts to existing members of the Riverview team we are ensuring that the candidates embody the Riverview Law values and culture.’ Steven continued by saying: ‘It’s been a pleasure to see the individuals who were awarded the first training contracts in 2014 grow and develop so much since September. I am proud to be working in a business where we nurture talent across the board whether that be through training contracts, apprenticeships or other training routes.’ The successful applicants will begin their training contracts on 28th September 2015. Anyone interested in a career at Riverview Law can find out more via the careers page on their website here.

April 2015 Market Horizon Scanning

Welcome to the April 2015 edition of the Riverview Law Market Scanning Report. As part of our market and horizon scanning activities we have always collected and circulated internally relevant legal market articles, commentaries, reports and blogs. When we shared this data with a GC he asked why we didn’t routinely share this with him because he’d find it invaluable. It was a good question! So, we now publish this report which, as you’ll see below, contains links to what we think are the most interesting and relevant legal market commentaries of March 2015 and previous months. Best wishes,

The Riverview Law R&D Team

March 2015

Fresh thinking on the evolving BigLaw – NewLaw taxonomy http://rv-l.com/1H3Qjqh Beaton Capital January 15 2015 IBM Watson: 10 New Jobs For Cognitive Computing http://rv-l.com/1JnHUgT Information Week March 12 2015

Billy Beane’s five lessons for business success http://rv-l.com/1Cnsfs1 The Guardian October 24 2014

Humans Need Not Apply http://rv-l.com/1H47hF6 YouTube August 13 2014

Is your lawyer smarter than IBM’s Watson? http://rv-l.com/1CUmtS4 IT News March 31 2015 Watson is the ‘Third Era of computing’ says IBM director Steve Abrams http://rv-l.com/1PjdSyQ The Drum March 30 2015

H&R Block Forced to Shut Down Immigrant Document Service by the Bar http://rv-l.com/1NT4b6P Lawyering Blog March 14 2015

Jeremy Clarkson – sacked by the BBC – tips for dealing with misconduct in the workplace

Jeremy Clarkson’s sacking by the BBC this week has caused a divide in public opinion. Did Director General Tony Hall act correctly when he sacked one of the BBC’s most successful presenters or was he left with no other option? Public opinion is one thing, but Tony Hall will have had to consider the duty of care the BBC owes to its staff and the BBC’s internal procedures for dealing with such issues. Employers are often faced with a similar question when a member of staff ‘crosses a line’ as Tony Hall described Mr Clarkson’s alleged attack on a work colleague. Employers have a duty of care towards staff and if action is required to be taken as a result of misconduct, employers have to navigate a range of employment regulations to ensure a fair procedure is followed and to avoid potential litigation. Jeremy Clarkson is likely to have been self-employed and as such it appears the BBC has followed its internal procedures and confirmed that the popular TV host’s contract would not be renewed. Many businesses have to deal with disciplinary issues regarding their employees – the procedures for dealing with employee misconduct issues can be more complex than when dealing with self-employed individuals, as employees are afforded additional employment law protection. We’ve considered some top tips on how to deal with employee disciplinary issues in the workplace.

Top tips

Follow a road map – once you become aware of a disciplinary issue, take some time to prepare your approach. Familiarise yourself with your company disciplinary policies and follow them. Refer to the Acas Code of Practice on Disciplinary and Grievance Procedures. Consider whether there have been any similar cases in the past whereby a precedent has been set. Consider who is in the driving seat – Designate roles within the process at the outset so that the right people are involved at each stage to conduct investigations, hearings and appeals. Ideally, to ensure impartiality, you should have a different senior member of staff conduct each stage in the process. Don’t stall – it’s essential that disciplinary issues are dealt with promptly. This is particularly the case when you are dealing with a potential gross misconduct issue. Consider whether suspension of the employee is necessary. Be aware of your reaction times – a disciplinary process can take many twists and turns. New information or evidence may come to light at any point in the process. Make sure you react to new information and be prepared to conduct further investigations if necessary, before moving onto the next stage in the process. Complete a log book – you should record all stages in the process and all evidence that you have relied upon should be documented. If the case did result in an Employment Tribunal claim being made against your company you will need to demonstrate that a decision to dismiss was fair. Often Employment Tribunal cases will not be heard until over a year after the event. Memories fade and witnesses may have left the business. Consider documenting the decision making process and outline what factors impacted the decision to dismiss. Get underneath the bonnet – Don’t pre judge the case. Listen impartially to the employee and any witnesses. Fully consider the factual evidence before you prior to making a decision. An Employment Tribunal could deem a dismissal to be unfair if they determine that the dismissal was pre-determined.   The Acas Code of Practice on Disciplinary and Grievance Procedures has recently been revised. You can see a copy of the revised version here.  

Proposed Increase in Court Fees: A deterrent to spurious claims or a barrier to justice?

Every Claimant, who issues legal proceedings through the court system, is required to pay a court issue fee (this also applies to Defendants who issue a counterclaim). The issue fee payable is directly linked to the sum claimed. Following a consultation in December 2013, on proposals to increase court fees in a number of areas, the Ministry of Justice has recently announced it will increase issue fees for money claims from 9 March 2015. The fee increases for money claims means:

  • The fee for claims from £1 – £9,999 will remain unchanged;
  • The fee for claims from £10,000 – £199,999 will be five per cent of the claim;
  • The fee for claims for £200,000 and above will be fixed at £10,000; and
  • There will be a 10 per cent discount on fees for claims from £10,000 – £99,999 filed electronically.

The proposed increase in court fees has sparked much debate. The table below gives an idea of the percentage by which some court issue fees will increase. In some instances, the court issue fee will rise by over 600%.

Value of claim £ Fee now £ (paper) New fee £ Increase in fee £ % increase
20,000 610 1,000 390 64%
40,000 610 2,000 1,390 228%
90,000 910 4,500 3,590 395%
150,000 1,315 7,500 6,185 470%
190,000 1,315 9,500 8,185 622%
200,000 1,515 10,000 8,725 576%
250,000 1,720 10,000 8,280 481%

  The reasoning behind the proposed increases The Ministry of Justice hope to generate £120 million annually from the proposed increased court fees, as there is an argument that people using the court system do not currently pay for the full service they receive. The deficit last year was around £100 million. Accordingly, the government has taken the view that the courts cannot be immune from tough decisions in order to bring public spending in line with what they can afford. The government has explained that its proposals to increase court fees will not affect those bringing a small claim i.e. a claim under £10,000. Instead it will only affect claimants issuing claims for large monetary sums who will require a more extensive service from the court. There is also an argument that increasing the court fees will act as a deterrent to those bringing a spurious/unfounded claim, and will ensure that claimants properly consider the merits of their claim before taking the decision to issue legal proceedings. On that basis, the government has argued that it does not envisage a decrease in genuine claims. Opposition to the proposed increase in fees The Law Society has issued a pre-action protocol letter for judicial review to challenge the government’s decision to increase court fees by such a significant amount. The Law Society has argued that a substantial proportion of civil litigation should be funded by the public purse rather than wholly by the litigants themselves, as it is in the interests of the civilised society in which we live for litigants to seek redress through the court system rather than ‘take matters into their own hands’. In addition, the Law Society has questioned how the government will utilise the increased revenue and, if there is to be a major investment into the court system, queried whether this should actually lead to a decrease in court fees moving forward. The issue has sparked a lively debate in the House of Lords. One speaker has pointed out that the imposition of substantial fees has led to an 80% reduction in employment appeal tribunal applications and a 90% reduction in sex discrimination cases. The concern is that civil claims will follow this pattern and that claimants with legitimate claims will no longer be able to afford to seek recourse through the justice system. Watch this space… The debate as to whether the increase in court fees will act as a deterrent to spurious claims or as a barrier to justice looks set to continue. The court fees will increase on 9 March 2015. However, with this change comes fierce opposition. We will have to watch this space to see how this issue is resolved.  

Riverview Law opens Manchester office

Wirral-based Riverview Law has today opened its first Manchester office. The office located at The Hive in the City’s Northern Quarter, will initially be occupied by up to 20 Riverview Law staff. The business plans to double the number of staff in Manchester over the next twelve months. The new opening comes at a time of significant expansion, which has seen revenue growth of over 100% pa in the last few years fuelled by contract wins with large global organisations.  Kate Thomsett, Head of HR at Riverview Law, says: “This is an exciting day for Riverview Law. Manchester has a thriving legal community and like Wirral, will be a great catchment area for us to expand our team and keep ahead of market demand for our services.” Tim Newns, Chief Executive of MIDAS said “Riverview Law’s decision to open a Manchester office is a testament to the city’s highly evolved financial and professional services sector. The firm joins a large number of legal companies that have chosen to set up an office in Manchester, attracted by the talent, expertise and market opportunity that the city offers. We welcome them to the city, and look forward to continuing to support them as they build their presence” Riverview Law currently has a range of vacancies in its Manchester and Wirral offices for commercial solicitors, business law executives, client managers and IT professionals.  Further information can be found at the Riverview Law Join Us pages.

March 2015 Market Horizon Scanning

Welcome to the March 2015 edition of the Riverview Law Market Scanning Report. As part of our market and horizon scanning activities we have always collected and circulated internally relevant legal market articles, commentaries, reports and blogs. When we shared this data with a GC he asked why we didn’t routinely share this with him because he’d find it invaluable. It was a good question! So, we now publish this report which, as you’ll see below, contains links to what we think are the most interesting and relevant legal market commentaries of February 2015 and previous months. Best wishes,

The Riverview Law R&D Team

February 2015

“Think-time” topics for legal departments http://rv-l.com/17NGqPk Thomson Reuters January 2015 Clash of the Titans: Big Four vs MBB vs BigLaw http://rv-l.com/1M35wXX Beaton Capital February 16 2015 Legal Efficiency 2015 http://rv-l.com/1F5awck Raconteur February 2015 A win-win situation http://rv-l.com/1GfCMN6 International Bar Association February 2015 Insurers urged to seize ‘opportunity’ as driverless cars hit UK roads http://rv-l.com/1aJTOWx Post February 16 2015 BigLaw resists techo evolution over fear of losing billable hours http://rv-l.com/1M4JKVy The Global Legal Post February 20 2015 This is the Boat: Stop Waiting for the Next Big Thing — By David Curle http://rv-l.com/17NNmvO Thomson Reuters February 24 2015 Consultancy chief challenges Susskind impact technology http://rv-l.com/1zEwgXI Legal Futures February 25 2015

Legal Efficiency Report as seen in The Times – Case Study on Riverview Law & University of Liverpool

Further to recent announcements regarding technology and Artificial Intelligence, Riverview Law and the University of Liverpool are featured in a case study on page 4 of the Raconteur Legal Efficiency Report published in The Times. The below is originally from the ‘Legal Efficiency Report’ published by Raconteur Media on 19th February 2015 in The Times. The Agent Applications, Research and Technology (Agent ART) Group at Liverpool University is a leading centre of pure and applied research in autonomous agents and multi-agent systems. In everyday English, this is the science underpinning the development of robots, either real or virtual, capable of making their own decisions in complex situations, including conflicts with other robots. This is a field at the cutting edge of information technology. At first sight the Agent ART Group appears to have little in common with Riverview Law, a new-style legal business set up in Liverpool in 2010, which has DLA  Piper as a minority shareholder, and provides legal advisory outsourcing and technology solutions to in-house legal functions of large corporations. Last month, however, the firm announced it had set up a “knowledge transfer partnership” with the University of Liverpool to find ways of developing the university’s artificial intelligence (AI) expertise in the legal field. The firm says the partnership will enable it to apply a range of leading-edge computer science expertise in areas such as text processing, network analysis, computational argumentation and data mining. “A primary objective of this project is to automate some of the cognitive abilities of knowledge workers to provide organisations with intelligent decision support tools,” Agent ART says. The hope is to create artificial intelligence software capable of automating routine legal tasks, speeding up and cutting the price of services. In particular, the firm is working with Katie Atkinson, reader in the Agent ART Group of the university’s Department of Computer Science. She describes her research as concerning “computational models of argument, with a particular focus on persuasive argumentation in practical reasoning and how this can be applied in domains such as e-democracy, law and agent systems”. Dr Atkinson says it is a good fit. “We are delighted to be working with such an innovative company as Riverview Law. From our first meeting we were struck by the commitment its team has to the application of technology, not only in its own business, but also in the way it delivers services to its global customers. Meetings with those customers and the wider Riverview Law team simply confirmed our desire to work with them and show how we can commercialise our research,” she says. Karl Chapman, chief executive of Riverview Law, comments: “Over the last 18 months, as we developed our thinking in the AI and expert systems field, we were delighted to find such relevant world-class expertise on our doorstep – North-West England really is becoming the centre of the legal universe. We are very focused on providing expert systems and tools that support knowledge work, and the way AI and such systems can help our teams and our customers make quicker and better decisions.” Read the full report here.

February 2015 Market Horizon Scanning

Welcome to the February 2015 edition of the Riverview Law Market Scanning Report. As part of our market and horizon scanning activities we have always collected and circulated internally relevant legal market articles, commentaries, reports and blogs. When we shared this data with a GC he asked why we didn’t routinely share this with him because he’d find it invaluable. It was a good question! So, we now publish this report which, as you’ll see below, contains links to what we think are the most interesting and relevant legal market commentaries of January 2015 and previous months. Best wishes,

The Riverview Law R&D Team

January 2015

Law firms failing to meet threat of market disruption, says report http://rv-l.com/1vpeeh8 Legal Futures February 02 2015 Questions about Uberisation of professional services http://rv-l.com/1zevDbG Beaton Capital February 02 2015 Doctor Watson will see you now, if IBM wins in Congress http://rv-l.com/1uWL3My Pittsburgh Post-Gazette January 29 2015 AP’s ‘robot journalists’ are writing their own stories now http://rv-l.com/1ArtSd1 The Verge January 29 2015 Applying Clayton Christensen’s theories to BigLaw vs NewLaw http://rv-l.com/1KqIJnZ Beaton Capital January 12 2015 The on-demand economy http://rv-l.com/1KqGT6D The Economist January 03 2015 Demystifying Artificial Intelligence http://rv-l.com/1zA6TcO Deloitte University Press November 04 2014 From Big Law to Lean Law http://rv-l.com/1DEI0gV Social Science Research Network 2013

Riverview Law plans Manchester office opening following 100% revenue growth

Following revenue growth of over 100% and a host of new contract wins, Wirral-based Riverview Law is to open a Manchester office. Kate Thomsett, Head of HR at Riverview Law says: “Our main office is in Bromborough, Wirral, and with further significant growth anticipated in 2015, we will continue to grow this office rapidly. However, we’ve chosen to also open a new Manchester office as part of our expansion strategy. Like Wirral, Manchester is a great catchment area for the skills we’re looking for – solicitors, paralegals, client managers, IT professionals.” The business is currently sourcing a suitable location and expects to open in the City during Q1 2015. Alongside the opening, the business expects to recruit an additional 30 people across both offices. Kate Thomsett adds: “Customers are quickly adopting our approach to legal service delivery. They buy-in to our culture and our fixed-priced technology and data-led model. We’re looking for talented professionals who like spending time with customers and who also know how to have fun and work as part of one team.” The opening of the Manchester office follows on from the recent launch of ‘Riverview Law In-house’, which includes a range of software modules that help in-house legal teams in large organisations manage matters, evolve their operating model and improve their effectiveness and efficiency. Earlier this month Riverview Law also announced a partnership with the University of Liverpool to exploit its Artificial Intelligence expertise. Kate Thomsett says: “We invest heavily in our team so that they can become the future leaders of our business. We only offer training contracts to existing team members and we have up to 10 training contracts beginning in September 2015. Budding solicitors should join us before March 2015 to be able to apply for one of these places.” Steven Zdolyny, Director of Legal Services at Riverview Law, says: “We offer great quality work with FTSE100 companies, flexible working hours and without the pressure of time recording and billing targets. One of our recent private practice recruits described our culture as ‘liberating’. We’d encourage anyone to get in touch if they’re looking to develop their career within a positive, energetic and innovative environment.” For more information on current vacancies and joining Riverview Law visit the Join Us page.

January 2015 Market Horizon Scanning

Happy New Year and welcome to the January 2015 edition of the Riverview Law Market Scanning Report. As part of our market and horizon scanning activities we have always collected and circulated internally relevant legal market articles, commentaries, reports and blogs. When we shared this data with a GC he asked why we didn’t routinely share this with him because he’d find it invaluable. It was a good question! So, we now publish this report which, as you’ll see below, contains links to what we think are the most interesting and relevant legal market commentaries of the last month – December 2014 and one from 1st January 2015. Best wishes,

The Riverview Law R&D Team

December 2014

Does the UK know something we don’t about alternative business structures? http://rv-l.com/1BFvcWo ABA Journal January 01 2015 New report looks into Global healthcare decision support and IBM Watson http://rv-l.com/1BFuclb WhaTech December 22 2014 Big law firms hiring poor-performing barristers, analysts claim http://rv-l.com/14rU7SZ Legal Futures December 22 2014 People vs Technology: A Modern Prizefight http://rv-l.com/1BFtKn2 SeytLines December 17 2014 What we read about deep learning is just the tip of the iceberg http://rv-l.com/1IksAzl Gigaom December 15 2014 A Broader View of Change in the Legal Marketplace http://rv-l.com/1AlfgeK Legal Mosaic December 15 2014 Report: artificial intelligence will cause “structural collapse” of law firms by 2030 http://rv-l.com/1xNCXsH Legal Futures December 1 2014 More and Less: In our second annual in-house survey, corporate legal teams are continuing to grow amid strong demand for their counsel. How high can general counsel build their empires? http://rv-l.com/1944Q4T The In-House Lawyer December 2014 Humans Need Not Apply http://rv-l.com/1KhI8aU CGP Grey August 13 2014

Riverview Law and University of Liverpool announce Artificial Intelligence partnership

Riverview Law, the fixed priced legal services business, has entered into a Knowledge Transfer Partnership (KTP) with the University of Liverpool designed to leverage the University’s Artificial Intelligence expertise in the legal market. Alongside recently announced initiatives, the KTP enables Riverview Law to apply a range of leading-edge computer science expertise in areas as diverse as Artificial Intelligence (AI), text processing, network analysis, computational argumentation and data mining. A primary objective of this project is to automate some of the cognitive abilities of knowledge workers to provide organisations with intelligent decision support tools. This announcement follows on from the recent launch of ‘Riverview Law In-house’, which includes a range of software modules that help In-house legal teams in large organisations manage matters, evolve their operating model and improve their effectiveness and efficiency. It also follows confirmation that Riverview Law is setting-up a separate technology business to exploit the software that it has built and the IP that it has and is creating. Dr Katie Atkinson, Reader in the Agent Applications, Research, and Technology (Agent ART) Group of the Department of Computer Science at the University of Liverpool, says: “We are delighted to be working with such an innovative company as Riverview Law. From our first meeting we were struck by the commitment its team has to the application of technology, not only in its own business but also in the way it delivers services to its global customers. Meetings with those customers and the wider Riverview Law team simply confirmed our desire to work with them and show how we can commercialise our research.” Katie is also Program Chair for the 2015 ICAIL conference of the International Association for Artificial Intelligence and Law. Karl Chapman, Chief Executive of Riverview Law said: “Over the last 18 months, as we developed our thinking in the AI and expert systems field, we were delighted to find such relevant world-class expertise on our doorstep – North-West England really is becoming the centre of the legal universe! This is another big step in the evolution and growth of Riverview Law. We are very focused on providing expert systems and tools that support knowledge work and the way AI and such systems can help our teams and our customers make quicker and better decisions.”